The Tech Humanist Show: Episode 11 – Marcus Whitney

About this episode’s guest:

Marcus Whitney is Founding Partner of Jumpstart Health Investors, the most active venture capital firm in America focused on innovative, healthcare companies with a portfolio of over 100 companies. He is also co-founder and minority owner of Major League Soccer team, Nashville Soccer Club.

Marcus is the author of the best-selling book Create and Orchestrate, about claiming your Creative Power through entrepreneurship. He is also the producer and host of Marcus Whitney LIVE, an interview show live-streamed M-F 12 Central on Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn, Twitter and Twitch, and Marcus Whitney’s Audio Universe, a podcast on all major platforms.

He tweets as @MarcusWhitney.

This episode streamed live on Thursday, September 24, 2020. Here’s an archive of the show on YouTube:

About the show:

The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O’Neill.

Subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O’Neill channel on YouTube for updates.

Transcript

00:01
all right hello
00:03
humans good to see some of you turning
00:07
up i see some numbers starting to pop
00:09
i’m glad to see it
00:10
glad to see you all uh showing up and
00:13
i’d love to hear from you
00:14
just pop on in the comments and tell me
00:17
who’s tuning in and where you are and
00:20
you know how the weather is where you
00:21
are i think here in new york we actually
00:23
had a little
00:24
resurgence of summer the last day or two
00:26
and it’s kind of funny because
00:28
everybody’s all
00:29
into the pumpkin spice latte season and
00:31
now we’ve got a little return of 80
00:33
degrees and
00:33
it’s kind of not really congruous so
00:36
yeah let me know who’s out there
00:39
glad to see oh those numbers are really
00:41
popping up so give me some
00:43
give me some comments i want to hear
00:44
from you
00:46
you already know that you are tuned into
00:47
the tech humanist show
00:49
and this is a multimedia format program
00:51
exploring how data and technology
00:53
shape the human experience and i am your
00:55
host kate o’neil and
00:57
so i’m excited today i’m going to be
00:59
telling you all about
01:00
the guests who’s tuned in i suspect
01:02
that’s a lot of the reason why some of
01:03
you are tuned in
01:05
uh but but so far no comments i know i’m
01:08
seeing the numbers so you guys are just
01:09
a silent bunch out there you’re not
01:11
gonna be playful and interactive
01:13
come on you gotta bring it i’ll start
01:16
introducing our guest
01:17
and you keep you keep bringing those
01:18
comments i bet there’s just some
01:19
elaborate comments happening like you’re
01:22
you’re typing novels in the comment
01:24
sections that is what’s happening
01:29
well here we go so today we are talking
01:32
with marcus whitney
01:33
who is founding partner of jumpstart
01:35
health investors the most active venture
01:37
capital firm in america focused on
01:39
innovative healthcare companies with a
01:41
portfolio of a hundred companies
01:43
he’s also co-founder and minority owner
01:45
of major league soccer team
01:47
nashville soccer club that’s a really
01:49
cool detail don’t you think
01:51
uh we’re gonna talk about that marcus is
01:52
the author of the recently launched and
01:54
best-selling book
01:55
create and orchestrate about claiming
01:57
your creative power through
01:58
entrepreneurship
01:59
he is also the producer and host of
02:01
marcus whitney live
02:03
an interview show live streamed monday
02:05
through friday every day
02:06
12 central on facebook youtube linkedin
02:09
twitter and twitch
02:10
i stream to twitch too and nobody ever
02:12
tunes in i’m going to ask him if he gets
02:13
any
02:14
viewers on twitch and marcus whitney’s
02:16
audio universe a podcast on all major
02:18
platforms
02:19
he’s also got some other credentials
02:20
that he’s asked me not to read but i’m
02:22
going to tell you
02:23
he’s a member of a bunch of boards he’s
02:25
gotten a bunch of honors and
02:26
recognitions this guy he’s really cool
02:29
and i’ve known him for
02:30
you know somewhere in the in the realm
02:32
of a decade
02:33
super excited to to bring this
02:35
discussion to you so audience start
02:36
getting those questions ready i don’t
02:38
care how shy you’re feeling in your
02:39
comment field
02:40
i want you to start warming up your
02:42
typing fingers
02:43
get ready for our outstanding guest oh
02:45
and please do note that as a live show
02:47
we’ll do our best to vet comments and
02:49
and feel them in real time uh we might
02:52
not get to all of them but we
02:53
i so appreciate you being here and
02:55
participating in the show so
02:57
with that please welcome my very dear
03:00
friend
03:01
marcus whitney marcus you are live on
03:04
the tech humanist show
03:05
sweet hey kate hey oh my gosh what a
03:09
thrill this is such a fun thing to be
03:11
able to
03:12
bring our real life friendship into this
03:14
virtual format
03:16
yep you were one of the first people
03:18
that uh i connected with in this manner
03:21
when this whole crazy covert 19 thing
03:22
started happening and so
03:24
uh this feels like completing the circle
03:27
yeah it does i know we uh
03:28
it was a fun uh sort of joining of all
03:31
of the
03:31
superpowers of robbie my husband as you
03:34
know who is a photographer and he’s been
03:36
helping me a lot with amv
03:38
and camera setup and i know he he gave
03:41
you some guidance
03:42
but you got you got your lighting and
03:44
your camera and everything looking so
03:45
sweet and your show
03:46
is always so impressive i’m always
03:48
amazed that you’re able to do
03:50
a monday through friday’s show once a
03:52
week is
03:53
a lot well you’re a lot more buttoned up
03:56
than i am
03:57
i just kind of like show on turn on the
03:59
buttons thankfully i look good
04:00
because robbie told me what camera to
04:02
buy and i just have like a quick 30
04:04
minute conversation yours is far more
04:05
professional
04:06
oh well you know it’s very sweet of you
04:09
to say
04:10
meanwhile people are out there rolling
04:12
their eyes but i
04:14
think i would imagine that for those who
04:16
are tuned in that one of the first
04:18
conversations we need to have to address
04:20
some questions for people is
04:21
that you’re probably curious about this
04:23
whole professional soccer thing so how
04:25
did you end up
04:27
i know you talk about in the book uh but
04:29
for those who haven’t had the chance to
04:30
read it yet how did you get a
04:31
professional sport to your town
04:33
and you end up being a minority owner of
04:35
it let’s hear a quick version of that
04:37
story
04:38
sure um you know i think we’re going to
04:40
talk a little bit later on about
04:42
how special nashville is and nashville’s
04:44
not the only city in america there are
04:46
many cities in america where
04:47
um i i think it’s often these these tier
04:50
two cities i was born and raised in
04:51
brooklyn new york
04:52
but these tier two cities have this kind
04:54
of can
04:55
do community oriented spirit not all of
04:58
them but many of them do i think about
04:59
places like columbus for example
05:01
and nashville is just one of those
05:02
places and so you know
05:04
when somebody says hey we ought to have
05:06
something here if you can get you know
05:08
five or ten people to to agree
05:10
you might be on your way to having a
05:12
movement going and i think that’s that’s
05:14
really how professional
05:15
soccer got to nashville it didn’t start
05:17
with me um and it probably didn’t even
05:18
start with the guy i’m about to tell you
05:20
about but a guy named chris jones
05:22
he started a twitter account when uh the
05:24
nashville metros which was a
05:25
professional amateur
05:26
based team uh in nashville that had been
05:29
here for decades
05:30
shut down unfortunately and uh we had a
05:32
lapse where we didn’t have a soccer team
05:33
to cheer for
05:34
and chris got on twitter and created a
05:37
an account called nashville fc
05:39
nashville football club and said hey you
05:41
know we ought to have a community-based
05:42
club so that you know
05:44
um in the event that something happens
05:46
we can kind of
05:47
weather what a normal ownership group
05:48
wouldn’t be able to and a bunch of
05:50
people started following and he said
05:51
okay well if you all are following why
05:53
don’t we just set up a quick 75
05:55
membership and he had like you know
05:56
hundreds of people sign up for that so i
05:58
was number 86
05:59
okay and uh and it went from just being
06:02
like a group of people who were meeting
06:03
in bars to talk about the future and the
06:05
possibility of it
06:07
to fielding uh just like five aside
06:09
teams just like you know after work kind
06:11
of teams you know what i mean
06:12
um to getting a franchise in the fourth
06:16
division of u.s soccer
06:17
called the nashville premier soccer
06:19
league as an amateur but we
06:21
we entered in and uh made the playoffs
06:23
in the very first season started having
06:24
a thousand to two thousand people coming
06:26
out per game
06:27
and that showed that there was real
06:28
momentum that if you could do that for a
06:30
non-profit community based thing imagine
06:32
what could happen if you threw some
06:33
money behind it
06:34
so uh chris reached out to me towards
06:36
the end of the first season and asked me
06:38
to become
06:39
uh more involved um that ended up with
06:41
me quickly becoming the chairman of the
06:43
the non-profit group
06:45
and then it was just sort of like the
06:46
the race was on uh from from that point
06:49
uh there was a ton of momentum in the
06:51
news and the media about the potential
06:52
of other soccer organizations coming to
06:54
town it created
06:55
a little bit of pressure on us to say
06:57
hey if soccer is going to come to town
06:59
we ought to be the ones to sort of make
07:00
it happen
07:01
and uh then my my skill set at the time
07:04
was based on entrepreneurship and
07:05
raising money so
07:06
i did what i do packaged up our team
07:09
had an investor pitch meeting and uh we
07:12
were able to
07:12
put together an investor group that said
07:14
yeah we’re going to take this thing to
07:15
the next
07:16
level and so david dill who’s now the
07:18
ceo of lifepoint health
07:19
very large health system and chris
07:21
redager um healthcare entrepreneur here
07:23
in town
07:24
and myself ended up rounding out the
07:26
investment group we
07:27
received a franchise in what was the
07:29
third division called usl
07:31
uh that moved to the second division and
07:33
then uh major league soccer announced
07:35
that it was going to expand
07:37
and uh nashville was at the bottom of
07:39
the list but then john ingram who is a
07:42
hometown billionaire
07:43
decided he wanted to really get behind
07:45
it john bought a majority in our club
07:47
collectively we went forward and we
07:49
became the first expansion team
07:51
uh of of this next class so we’re
07:54
playing our first season right now
07:56
um we’re doing great in in our last uh i
07:59
guess
07:59
ten games we’re four three and three um
08:02
you know no team
08:03
coming in into the league in their
08:04
expansion year has scored more points
08:07
with the exception of atlanta and la and
08:09
um
08:10
before it was the beautiful thing about
08:12
everything i mean nothing is beautiful
08:13
about kobet but
08:15
we got to have our first home match at
08:17
uh
08:18
nissan stadium which is where the
08:19
tennessee titans played national
08:21
football league team and um we packed
08:24
out the house had you know i
08:25
can’t remember the number but it was in
08:27
the 40s or 50 000 people
08:29
there and it was awesome just for like
08:30
one night before covert shut everything
08:33
down
08:34
we had you know knock nashville’s uh
08:36
soccer community out and it was it was
08:38
an awesome night so
08:39
it’s been a lot of fun it was really you
08:40
know the story is much much longer than
08:42
that which is why i did
08:43
yeah book to it but you know hopefully
08:45
that sort of frames up how it happened
08:47
yeah you summarize it well there because
08:49
i think it’s really worth people
08:51
taking the time of course i’m i’m
08:52
recommending that folks buy and read
08:54
your book create and orchestrate
08:55
uh but i think in particular because you
08:58
know
08:58
it may strike some as odd that i would
09:00
start this discussion
09:02
on the tech humanist show talking about
09:04
soccer but i think what you demonstrate
09:06
so aptly in that story in the way you
09:10
tell it
09:10
in the book is how much it required
09:14
number one a bold response like you just
09:16
said when when there was that one
09:18
announcement where you decided to sort
09:20
of
09:20
take a stand and say no no if it’s going
09:22
to be anybody it’s going to be
09:23
us yeah that may have been a little bit
09:26
contrarian to what people might expect
09:28
you to do in that moment because you
09:29
might just you might think you know oh
09:31
well you would just be excited about
09:32
there being the possibility of something
09:34
bigger happening and just accept the
09:37
faith that like well you got it to the
09:38
point where people were enthusiastic but
09:41
but that wasn’t good enough and then i
09:42
think you also are demonstrating
09:44
how this orchestrate concept really
09:47
works when you take it to its fullest
09:50
idea yeah uh thank you for
09:54
for framing it that way i think uh in
09:57
in the in the chapter what i try to help
09:59
everyone understand is the the single
10:01
thread
10:02
that everybody and everybody came in at
10:04
different times with
10:05
plenty of different motivations right at
10:07
different stages you know obviously when
10:09
john came
10:10
in you’re talking about playing a game
10:11
that only a billionaire can play right
10:13
so that that
10:14
that lowers the number of people in the
10:15
playing field significantly right right
10:18
when chris started when the boundary
10:19
with a with a barrier to entry was just
10:21
start a twitter account and have the
10:23
courage to step out there and say hey
10:25
who’s with me
10:25
right two totally different um
10:28
thresholds
10:28
but still uh i would say the unifying
10:31
thread was
10:33
we wanted a team for nashville by
10:36
nashville
10:36
and i think the thing that everybody
10:38
didn’t like the idea of was an
10:40
outsider coming in with money and we
10:42
were seeing a lot of that in our city
10:44
with
10:44
with many other businesses and real
10:46
estate people were just coming
10:48
with money and we just didn’t want our
10:49
soccer team to to be
10:51
like that you know we wanted it to be by
10:52
people who were here the community
10:54
everyone could trust that the people who
10:56
were leading the organization had the
10:58
city’s best interest in mind yeah and i
11:00
think
11:00
one of the things that seems like it
11:01
makes the soccer story so successful
11:04
is also part of what factors into a lot
11:06
of the other stories that you tell
11:08
in the book and that i know you to have
11:11
which do
11:12
tie into technology and entrepreneurship
11:14
uh even more
11:15
which is the character of nashville and
11:17
how that becomes a character
11:19
in these stories and of course having
11:21
lived there for you know 13 years myself
11:24
i experienced it firsthand but
11:26
i think some folks out there who are not
11:28
you know nashvillians or aren’t as
11:30
familiar with nashville may be wondering
11:32
you know how do i help promote my town
11:35
my community to be what it sounds like
11:38
nashville is in these stories a
11:40
character
11:40
unto itself that’s playing a role in
11:43
helping
11:44
you know build and support not just a
11:47
new professional soccer team
11:49
but also these entrepreneurial endeavors
11:51
that we’ll get in more
11:53
more into and building a tech community
11:54
almost from scratch and and you know
11:56
kind of fostering an ecosystem where
11:58
there wasn’t one how do how
12:00
do you know do you have recommendations
12:02
for how people can develop that kind of
12:03
community where they are
12:05
yeah um and and you know i i think i
12:08
think there’s
12:09
there’s a physical uh communities but
12:11
there’s also a ton of online communities
12:13
and i think they share the same
12:14
principle which is
12:16
um you’re actually trying to create
12:18
something
12:19
uh for people around you
12:22
in a way that’s bigger than you right
12:24
like you know you’re going to get
12:26
benefit from it okay so we don’t we
12:28
don’t need to sort of talk about what
12:29
are the
12:29
you know what’s the intention what are
12:31
you trying to get out of it you’re going
12:32
to get something out of it right
12:34
now what you get out of it may just be
12:35
social and political capital
12:37
okay it may not be money that you’re
12:38
extracting directly from it but if
12:40
you’re
12:41
at the center of making something
12:42
valuable for other people you’re going
12:44
to get something out of it so let’s just
12:45
put that to the side
12:46
and let’s talk about kate when we really
12:48
did meet you and i met
12:50
you know met really around bar camp
12:51
nashville right which an event that
12:54
uh a group of people many people through
12:56
in 2007
12:57
august wow 13 years ago 13 years ago
13:00
right
13:01
and nobody made money from that thing
13:03
you know in fact like at the end a
13:05
couple of us had to like stroke a check
13:07
paid for exit in and a couple of other
13:09
things right
13:10
but but what did we all get out of it
13:12
wow we got
13:13
you know friendships relationships this
13:15
sense of what
13:17
what was possible in in the city and for
13:19
those who
13:20
who are listening and i’m saying barca
13:21
nashville you don’t know what it is it
13:23
basically was a free conference it was a
13:24
free one day conference where anyone who
13:26
was interested in the digital landscape
13:28
whether that was blogging or computer
13:30
programming or design or
13:31
innovation generally speaking would just
13:34
come and
13:34
present to learn or have a conversation
13:36
or whatever just be around other
13:38
like-minded people
13:39
and when you just create space and then
13:41
you create you know really cool
13:42
interactions and ways for people to
13:44
learn and develop and grow and
13:45
and improve their network it’s
13:48
it’s a it’s a net plus for everybody
13:50
because everyone gets to get gets to be
13:52
upgraded in that experience
13:53
and then they can then um feed back into
13:56
it and you know the awesome thing about
13:57
barcamp was i really did it one year
13:59
that thing lived for you know 10 plus
14:01
years here right
14:02
you know with other people always every
14:04
year someone else rotating in
14:06
and and seeing it as uh you know an
14:08
honor to do it but also
14:10
there was this characteristic where if
14:11
you came in and you ran bar camp for a
14:13
year your personal
14:14
value in the community was was you know
14:17
elevated
14:18
yeah just as it was for me that very
14:19
first year that i did it and so and i
14:21
think we’re seeing this online in
14:22
communities as well right community
14:24
development
14:25
when people are trying to create a
14:26
community and they just want to like get
14:27
money out of it right away
14:29
they don’t go anywhere right because
14:31
people can smell a fraud a mile away
14:32
it’s like let’s just look at what you’re
14:34
doing here with the tech humanists like
14:36
the reason why it’s
14:36
why it’s growing and why people are
14:38
engaged and they come back week after
14:39
week is because
14:40
you’re selflessly giving right you know
14:42
you are
14:43
doing the work of booking the guests and
14:45
making a high quality show and showing
14:47
up on time showing up on time showing up
14:49
on time right
14:50
and and and giving people something
14:51
positive to think about quite frankly
14:53
in the midst of a world where look i we
14:56
all know what happened last night right
14:57
it’s like
14:59
this is it’s a tough time right and so
15:02
i i just think that community is about
15:06
understanding that we’re all
15:07
better together and just just
15:10
what can you do to help someone else
15:12
you’ll get something out of it
15:14
you know what i mean yeah yeah it feels
15:16
like
15:17
that’s one of the things that
15:18
entrepreneurship is
15:20
probably is misleading about
15:23
entrepreneurship that i feel like
15:25
people get into it in many cases because
15:27
they think about
15:28
the gains that they’re personally going
15:30
to get and so
15:31
often what you get out of
15:32
entrepreneurship when you approach it
15:34
especially when you approach it the way
15:35
you clearly have which is
15:37
as much more of a collaborative effort
15:40
and how can i build something
15:42
bigger than myself with bigger than what
15:44
i just myself can do
15:46
by orchestrating by you know being part
15:48
of teams
15:49
that can think bigger and out maneuver
15:52
you know that
15:53
what i could do on my own i i think
15:55
that’s a really
15:56
amazing lesson that you put forward in
15:59
this
16:00
in this book and and that serves as a
16:02
really great model for
16:03
community led anything so
16:07
community-led accelerator startup
16:09
accelerator community-led
16:10
you know football team soccer team
16:12
community-led whatever
16:14
you know technology conference so much
16:16
of what your story is about
16:18
seems like it’s about getting behind the
16:21
community and
16:22
elevating the community is that a fair
16:24
characterization do you think
16:25
yeah i think i think that it is and and
16:28
and it’s just it’s just what i’m
16:29
personally passionate about
16:30
um you know it’s i i
16:33
get i get a lot out of seeing other
16:36
people
16:37
experience joy and make progress and
16:41
i always seem to somehow experience joy
16:43
and make progress when that’s when it’s
16:45
happening right so
16:46
um it just it just works for me it’s not
16:48
it’s not a model for everybody but it
16:50
works really well for me
16:51
well you’re doing something you’re
16:52
actually passionate about it’s not like
16:54
you got into the soccer club thing
16:55
like for altruistic motives like gee
16:58
some people really
16:59
seem to care about soccer i think i’ll
17:01
help them get a soccer club in nashville
17:05
when i started i definitely was not
17:08
thinking about
17:09
uh and this is probably a good segue
17:11
into the entrepreneurship stuff but like
17:13
i started
17:14
i started because i was working too much
17:16
and i needed something
17:17
fun to take my mind off it um but you
17:20
know like
17:21
my wife rachel she basically is like i i
17:23
she says about me that i can’t have a
17:25
hobby
17:26
so like it starts as fun and then like i
17:28
somehow make it into a business mean
17:31
then it’s no longer fun it’s like this
17:33
thing i have to do i have to accomplish
17:35
and soccer was definitely that way
17:37
because it started with me just going to
17:39
the to the pub
17:40
at like six o’clock in the morning on
17:42
saturdays and going to watch premier
17:43
league soccer
17:44
and then this nashville you know fc
17:46
thing started uh
17:47
which eventually came became national
17:49
soccer club and that was cool and then
17:51
one day i came home and i was like
17:53
so babe i’m now the chairman of
17:54
nashville fc and she was like
17:56
oh my god like i know i saw this coming
18:00
you knew she was like all right you know
18:04
that’s hilarious but i feel like one of
18:06
the things too about entrepreneurship
18:07
besides
18:08
you know the mythology that uh it’s
18:11
a self-involved endeavor rather than
18:14
this community
18:15
entrenched thing that you have made it
18:17
so often
18:18
i think entrepreneurship is also a key
18:20
part of the mythology of technology you
18:22
know so when we think about
18:24
you know tech this whole concept of tech
18:27
that
18:27
infuses the tech humanist show and the
18:29
work that i do
18:31
so much of what has built this tech
18:33
ecosystem
18:34
and the tech concept has been
18:37
entrepreneurship so it’s a
18:38
it’s a key part of that mythology but
18:40
it’s also a key part of
18:42
the genuine opportunity that exists
18:44
there
18:45
and so i feel like what i get out of
18:47
your book and you know the creative work
18:49
you’re doing around this
18:50
around create and orchestrate it seems
18:52
to be at its core about
18:54
sharing what you’ve learned to make
18:56
entrepreneurship more inclusive
18:58
and and break down some of the barriers
19:00
to entry
19:02
that people might experience for a
19:03
variety of reasons but you know you talk
19:05
about being an
19:06
unlikely entrepreneur and and that you
19:09
see
19:09
the opportunity for many unlikely
19:11
entrepreneurs out there so what
19:12
motivated you to put
19:13
that resource together for other
19:15
unlikely entrepreneurs
19:18
yeah i i’ve used unlikely uh
19:21
as as sort of a tongue-in-cheek code for
19:25
come on i’m a black college dropout you
19:26
know what i’m saying like
19:28
and and really it’s not just like i’m an
19:30
entrepreneur
19:31
that i don’t know is
19:35
selling something you might expect me to
19:37
be selling right um
19:38
i’m i’m engaged in venture capital and
19:40
professional sports and
19:41
and um high-end technology digital
19:44
marketing like those are the kinds of
19:45
things that i get involved in and so
19:47
um there’s it’s definitely a code
19:50
right for those who would understand it
19:52
and for others they just sort of mean
19:53
what do you mean okay if you have to ask
19:55
that
19:56
you know um then we’re not being
19:58
intellectually honest with each other
19:59
and we’re not being honest right and and
20:02
i think the reason why
20:03
i i want to make it more accessible is
20:06
because
20:07
my belief is that the market is
20:10
ultimately uh
20:13
the market really doesn’t care that much
20:18
about your gender and your race and
20:21
those other kinds of things and your
20:22
credentials you know like
20:24
we could take it beyond demographics
20:25
like what about you the college
20:26
credentials
20:27
what kind of household you were brought
20:28
up in you know how much even how much
20:30
money you have in the bank today
20:31
right there are all sorts of really
20:33
clever ways to overcome all that stuff
20:34
and this that’s never been more true
20:36
than it is today with the internet right
20:37
whether you know muffy from the country
20:39
club all that sort of stuff
20:41
exactly all those kinds of things right
20:43
and and and so a lot of the
20:45
a lot of the things that that make
20:46
entrepreneurship inaccessible
20:48
are can you see yourself
20:51
as an entrepreneur you know which was
20:52
why i put my face on the front of the
20:54
book to be really clear like hey
20:56
you can see yourself as an entrepreneur
20:59
you know um
21:00
and and do you understand the
21:03
fundamentals of how entrepreneurship
21:04
works right i i don’t believe
21:06
entrepreneurship is like a paint by
21:08
numbers thing
21:09
uh but there are principles and there
21:10
are some core concepts that you do have
21:12
to learn over the
21:13
uh you know on your journey to becoming
21:16
a functional entrepreneur that everyone
21:18
who
21:18
is one takes for granted right but the
21:21
people who aren’t
21:22
looking are on the outside looking in
21:24
and uh
21:25
they’re it’s really pretty mystical
21:27
quite frankly and and it doesn’t need to
21:29
be mystical right
21:30
you know it doesn’t need to be locked up
21:31
in very very expensive mba programs or
21:33
anything like that it can be
21:35
it can be made uh very easy to consume
21:38
by the layman
21:38
especially if you wrap it in a narrative
21:40
which is why i wanted to make sure that
21:42
i didn’t just give information in my
21:43
book but i tried to kind of add in my
21:45
own narrative full of failures
21:46
right oh very candid i’m i’m so
21:49
impressed with how
21:50
uh ready you were to share these
21:53
you know you say failures i think you
21:55
were you were able to couch them in
21:57
you know true lessons learned which
21:59
which is not a failure
22:00
in a way right yeah for sure it’s it’s
22:03
it’s where i learned everything
22:04
important it’s like the stories of
22:05
success are not that valuable quite
22:07
frankly
22:08
but where you know when i’ve really
22:09
really failed that’s when
22:11
this missing principle or this really is
22:13
this missing concept
22:14
appeared you know it’s like you talk
22:16
about mythology it’s almost like uh i
22:17
don’t know that that’s that’s when
22:19
ah you know i
22:22
i got the i got the oracle you know when
22:25
i when i’ve
22:25
you know had to file bankruptcy or
22:27
whatever you know what i mean like it’s
22:29
it’s uh it’s definitely those points
22:31
where you realize you’re running into a
22:32
brick wall that
22:33
and you got something wrong but the
22:35
important thing is
22:36
they just add up um to your your
22:40
durability
22:40
your strength your wisdom and uh you
22:43
know for me entrepreneurship is a career
22:44
it’s like
22:45
i wrote this book about 20 years of my
22:47
life i’m 44.
22:48
i’m like i got two more of those you
22:51
know in me
22:52
and um and i’m gonna be way wiser for
22:54
the next two
22:56
uh and and so just trying to make sure
22:58
people understand entrepreneurship is
22:59
not the one business you’re doing today
23:00
it’s
23:01
it is a way of life it’s a way of
23:02
thinking and once you sort of get those
23:04
you know those principles and core
23:06
concepts in place uh it’s a it’s a it’s
23:08
a path to liberation
23:10
do you see the venture capital industry
23:12
changing
23:13
with regard to the biases you talked
23:15
about just a few minutes ago you know
23:16
you were talking about in the book how
23:19
some venture capital firms are using
23:22
a lot of data to try to get past their
23:24
own initial
23:25
biases that they may have when they’re
23:27
looking at you know the selection
23:28
process as you described you know
23:30
the kind of four-step process but when
23:32
they’re looking at these
23:33
this pool of opportunities if they don’t
23:36
see
23:37
a likely entrepreneur if they’re able to
23:40
see the potential of that company
23:43
maybe if they see it represented in data
23:45
rather than seeing you know
23:46
the the faces or the the demographics
23:49
presented to them but
23:51
i guess i wonder first of all do you see
23:53
that changing
23:54
and secondly do you do you think that
23:57
data
23:57
is the right way to circumvent that or
24:00
is it
24:01
is it a combination of things like more
24:03
and better representation like what
24:05
you’re trying to do
24:05
plus data plus maybe other factors
24:09
yeah i want to directly answer your
24:10
question and then i want to
24:12
give a much broader picture on the
24:14
change i see so
24:15
the direct answer is i do see it
24:17
changing and it is absolutely about
24:19
broader representation
24:21
full stop right that’s what it’s got to
24:22
be the data is not is insufficient
24:24
necessary but insufficient for the kind
24:26
of change we’re talking about
24:27
um now broad broader uh and this is even
24:31
beyond venture capital
24:33
just in the last three weeks i’ll say um
24:38
it has become very very clear to me that
24:41
2020 uh
24:45
has more technology-driven change
24:48
in it than i’ve seen since since 2007
24:51
right um for me 2007 was
24:55
really really really a big breakthrough
24:56
year i went to south by southwest
24:59
i got one of the early twitter accounts
25:00
then the iphone came out
25:02
then amazon web services became like
25:04
something that companies started using
25:07
there were other things that happened
25:08
that year i’m sure but those like just
25:10
think about
25:10
how much of the world today is social
25:13
networks mobile phones and cloud
25:14
computing right netflix announced a
25:16
streaming plan that year too i mean
25:17
there’s a lot of things when you start
25:19
trying to take stock of it
25:21
2007 was an unbelievable year okay
25:24
and thank you for bringing up the
25:25
netflix thing because that’s that’s
25:26
another massive massive paradigm of
25:29
change i am seeing changes
25:33
really driven by technology that i
25:35
haven’t seen since 2007. i i’ve
25:37
actually kind of got bored like where’s
25:39
the where’s the stuff
25:41
right and there is one such
25:44
change that that is not entirely
25:46
technology driven um it’s it’s largely
25:49
driven by a change in regulation with
25:50
the sec called 506 c
25:52
which uh allows venture capital firms to
25:55
still
25:56
only raise money from accredited
25:58
investors which for the uninitiated
26:00
basically means you make 200 250 000
26:02
a year or you have a net worth of one
26:05
million dollars not including the value
26:06
of your home
26:07
um that’s basically the threshold you
26:09
have to be able to pass in order to
26:10
invest in private investments
26:12
because they’re not well regulated okay
26:15
and the sec wants to protect people so
26:16
they want to make sure you can endure
26:17
the risk
26:18
so in the past what that has meant is in
26:20
the standard regulation called reg d
26:22
what that has meant
26:23
is you can’t advertise
26:26
so you can only raise money with closed
26:28
networks
26:29
because you can’t advertise well who has
26:32
the closed networks with access to
26:33
people that are for sure accredited well
26:35
that’s going to look a certain way
26:36
that’s going to be an inside club
26:37
right and so the regulations and the
26:39
policies
26:41
fostered a homogeneous industry
26:45
506 c basically says you can now market
26:49
and you can advertise because we now
26:50
have these third-party services that can
26:52
validate whether or not somebody is
26:54
actually an accredited investor
26:56
so that has opened up the the floodgates
26:59
but it
27:00
takes time for that regulation to really
27:02
hit well angel list which is pretty much
27:04
the premier platform
27:05
for angel investors and has been
27:07
innovating
27:08
in and around this topic rolled out this
27:11
year something called rolling funds
27:14
and at this point there’s probably been
27:16
100 rolling funds that have been created
27:18
they’re basically one-person funds sort
27:20
of with this whole theme of one-person
27:21
companies the whole part
27:22
paul jarvis company of one thing um one
27:25
person funds where they they just use
27:27
the angelus platform
27:28
the angelus infrastructure and they just
27:30
launch a fund and
27:31
similar to kickstarter if they have a
27:33
lot of social capital they can raise a
27:34
fund really really quickly
27:36
and someone can sign up for a fund the
27:37
same way they would sign up for
27:39
amazon it’s like you go through it’s an
27:40
e-commerce workflow and so
27:43
that is changing the complexion very
27:45
very quickly this feels like the kind of
27:47
disruption that i saw
27:48
quite frankly another 2007 uh innovation
27:51
which was accelerators right you know
27:52
tech stars and wycom really kind of came
27:54
to prominence in 2007.
27:56
and so uh this feels like an accelerator
28:00
kind of moment and i think we’re going
28:01
to see a lot of
28:03
new representation in the venture
28:05
capital space especially early stage
28:07
very very quickly um so that’s exciting
28:09
you know
28:10
it’s exciting yeah that is and it’s
28:13
interesting that you know you brought up
28:14
accelerators and that’s an interesting
28:16
segue but
28:17
but i also am interested in in
28:18
acknowledging that
28:20
there do seem to be some accelerators
28:22
and funds that are specifically focused
28:25
on
28:25
you know making sure that people of
28:27
color are funded and
28:28
women are funded and that sort of thing
28:30
so that seems like
28:31
it’s got to help but these um the 506 c
28:35
change sounds like well sea change
28:37
sounds like a uh
28:38
a sea change in the industry as well so
28:40
that’s a thank you for that education
28:42
i’m sure
28:43
i’m sure our viewers are are learning a
28:46
lot from that
28:47
you know one one question i have for you
28:49
you know is
28:51
the when i think about the kind of
28:53
orchestration that you talk about
28:55
in your book this is taking it to a
28:58
little bit more philosophical level i
29:00
guess
29:01
uh it strikes me as a very human
29:03
characteristic
29:04
like that’s it’s not maybe a uniquely
29:07
human characteristic but it’s a strongly
29:09
human characteristic right like it’s
29:10
about collaboration in a way that maybe
29:14
non-human animals are capable of but i
29:16
really feel like this is something that
29:17
we see
29:18
kind of as a human characteristic of
29:21
seeking a hole that’s bigger than your
29:23
own contribution
29:24
and having to give up a part of your
29:26
vision
29:27
to achieve it do you feel like people
29:30
can
29:31
practice and get better at this skill
29:34
um or or is this something that you know
29:37
you either have it or you don’t like
29:39
that you’re either wired for this kind
29:40
of collaboration
29:41
or you’re just going to be sort of a a
29:44
sole proprietor type of person
29:46
what do you what do you think people can
29:48
do to improve or or
29:49
get better at it if if you do think that
29:51
they can
29:53
uh in my opinion the evidence is
29:57
pretty overwhelming that we all have it
29:59
um
30:00
what i like to kind of revert back to is
30:02
just the premise that
30:03
everything that we see that was not
30:05
created in in nature
30:07
was created by humans um and
30:10
very little of it was created in a silo
30:12
meaning one person created it
30:14
almost all of it was as a result of
30:16
co-creation
30:17
right um and so there you go i mean we
30:20
can just kind of stop there it’s it’s
30:22
like
30:22
everything you see everything you use
30:24
took multiple perspectives multiple
30:26
skill sets multiple people working on
30:28
things
30:28
it’s fundamental to who we are and how
30:30
we got here
30:32
right so it’s it’s much more about
30:35
tapping into it
30:36
it’s much more about tapping into it and
30:38
i think there are a lot of
30:40
uh conventions and and
30:44
ways that we are developing people that
30:47
are not conducive to it
30:50
and so that’s why we need people to be
30:52
out here advocating and encouraging and
30:54
creating environments where people can
30:56
do this you know design thinking
30:57
shouldn’t be
30:58
such a sort of special thing it should
31:00
be sort of basic
31:02
you know it’s a sort of a basic
31:03
understanding you know
31:05
i i am getting more and more um
31:09
more and more strong in my uh
31:13
feelings about the damage that school is
31:16
is doing to to us um as we continue to
31:19
hold on to the model from the industrial
31:21
revolution
31:22
right um just just that what we were
31:24
trying to produce
31:26
then and that model and and our
31:29
unwillingness to like
31:30
innovate and advance from from that
31:33
model
31:34
is is really not helpful it’s it’s not
31:37
the skill set that we need we we need
31:39
people who understand themselves
31:41
who who know how to collaborate who know
31:43
how to work in groups
31:44
and who don’t uh
31:49
don’t fear failure we need people who
31:52
don’t feel fit
31:52
feel fear failure and that’s not what
31:55
the school systems of today are set up
31:57
for
31:57
they’re set up for individual working
31:59
don’t share work don’t share answers
32:01
right that’s not how things work in the
32:02
real world like
32:03
when do you ever have to do something
32:05
where you can’t get help from somebody
32:07
else
32:07
right right you know you also when you
32:10
mention design thinking too there’s even
32:11
you know kind of a criticism that’s
32:13
common about design thinking that it
32:14
doesn’t
32:15
it doesn’t involve you know users or or
32:18
the the people who are affected and you
32:20
know on the show a lot a lot of times we
32:22
talk about the
32:23
the harms that can be done to
32:24
communities by not involving the people
32:26
that are going to be
32:27
affected in those communities and so i
32:29
think even there it’s it’s
32:30
it’s in within that example there it
32:34
contains
32:34
a an example of how not thinking
32:38
holistically and communally and about
32:41
the impact
32:42
of you know what can happen with failure
32:44
what can go beyond failure into lessons
32:45
learned and so on
32:47
feels like it’s an opportunity to to
32:48
think in a more rich
32:50
integrative holistic way about this i
32:53
completely agree
32:54
and i and i feel like one of the things
32:57
that is happening right now that feels
32:59
like a fantastic
33:00
evolution uh is that i i think we’re
33:04
really starting to break that stuff down
33:05
this year you know it really feels like
33:08
the way that we think the way that we
33:11
frame and understand learning and the
33:13
way that we understand working together
33:14
is really starting to change
33:16
um for the better you know you know for
33:19
the better
33:19
and uh i hope that we can do it in a way
33:22
that uh
33:24
has a has an elevated understanding of
33:26
the relationship between humanity and
33:27
technology because that’s going to be
33:29
critical because the two shall never be
33:31
separate again
33:32
i don’t you know what i mean so we have
33:33
to integrate
33:35
human to human to tech and and
33:37
everything in between
33:39
um but it’s exciting i mean the stuff
33:40
i’m seeing out there is really exciting
33:42
right now
33:42
yeah and i would add to that end
33:44
business because that’s why
33:45
entrepreneurship i think is such a key
33:47
piece of this because
33:48
uh in in the work that i do so often
33:50
it’s about teaching business leaders
33:53
how the work that they do through
33:55
technology impacts humans and there’s
33:57
that sort of
33:57
triangle relationship there right so we
33:59
have to make sure that business
34:01
understands
34:01
that the technology it develops for
34:03
human experience creation
34:05
is is the the great um accelerator of
34:08
human experience and that you know those
34:10
things need to tie together business
34:12
incentives need to align with human
34:13
incentives and when entrepreneur
34:15
uh programs and accelerators and
34:18
everything are only focused on
34:20
you know incremental growth and and uh
34:23
profit and acceleration at that level
34:26
it’s not
34:27
incorporating that holistic human
34:29
discussion so i i think
34:30
that’s one of the reasons why i i found
34:33
you know i find
34:34
your story and your work so compelling
34:36
because of
34:37
its nature of being so community driven
34:39
and community tied
34:41
and i know of course you still got to
34:42
make you know you got to teach
34:44
entrepreneurs how to make a profit and
34:46
how to grow and find a market and you
34:48
know all of that stuff
34:49
because those are business fundamentals
34:51
but but i think you know where it sounds
34:53
like you’re coming from and where a lot
34:54
of i know
34:55
that the work that you do is anchored
34:57
really seems like it brings it back to
34:59
this understanding of
35:01
people in community and how that that
35:03
all ties together
35:05
yeah it’s it’s certainly not business at
35:07
all costs
35:08
you know or business above humanity it’s
35:11
business and service of humanity
35:13
simple you know um it’s actually pretty
35:16
easy
35:17
you know it’s actually pretty easy i
35:18
mean i think
35:20
the the big aha moment for me was
35:24
when i really understood financed
35:26
finance
35:27
as a discipline and i understood like
35:29
the mechanisms and the reports and just
35:31
how you structure the financial pro
35:33
forma and all those kinds of things
35:35
when i realized all the externalities
35:38
that we do not
35:39
hold businesses uh accountable for
35:43
that don’t ever show up in the finance
35:46
documents but that
35:47
they impact right all of those
35:49
externalities that’s when
35:52
that’s when it really hit me it was like
35:54
oh no no no no we have we
35:55
we’ve got to you know everybody we a we
35:58
need to broaden the scope of who
36:00
understands business because so many
36:02
people so many of the people who want to
36:03
do good in the world
36:04
they think like business is like this
36:06
bad thing and it’s like
36:08
the world speaks capitalism i like even
36:10
communists
36:11
are capitalists it is the universal
36:14
language
36:15
okay it’s it’s how the world works and
36:17
we need the do girders
36:19
to understand it so they can do it
36:22
you know because what we have right now
36:25
is the people who think it’s capitalism
36:26
at all costs
36:28
and think and think it’s business
36:30
humanity be damned
36:32
that’s obvious when you look at
36:33
everything that’s happening so what we
36:34
need we need to make people far
36:36
more business literate everybody so
36:37
everybody can get into the market and
36:39
compete
36:40
you know and and start to to break down
36:42
and create more fragments like
36:44
we’re way too consolidated that’s what
36:45
all this anti-trust stuff is about right
36:47
now like we need
36:48
more choice more more local you know
36:51
integration local technology providers
36:53
creating things that
36:54
the big monoliths couldn’t create right
36:56
because they’re they’re locally
36:57
sensitive
36:58
and uh and and appropriate so yeah i
37:02
you know for me this is and oh by the
37:05
way kate
37:06
we don’t teach entrepreneurship in
37:07
school right
37:09
right right or those financial
37:10
disciplines that you’re talking about
37:12
no these things run the world we know
37:15
they run the world
37:16
we we determine whether or not we think
37:18
everything is okay based on the stock
37:20
market even though it is completely
37:21
disconnected from the well-being of the
37:23
people
37:24
this is my rant lately in in 2020
37:28
i can’t tell you how many times i have
37:30
ranted the phrase
37:31
the economy is people and i just did it
37:33
again on twitter
37:34
because you know we keep talking about
37:36
the market we keep talking about you
37:38
know opening up the economy and opening
37:40
up
37:40
uh read businesses so that people can
37:42
start spending money within them again
37:44
i’m like guess what you’re just going to
37:46
spread the virus and you’re just going
37:47
to shut it down there’s going to be more
37:48
people sick and more people
37:50
dying and that’s just going to
37:51
promulgate this whole thing it’s going
37:52
to keep this whole these cycles going
37:55
because the economy is people and we
37:57
have to understand that we cannot
37:59
separate these abstract concepts of how
38:01
whether the economy is flourishing from
38:03
whether people are flourishing
38:05
and that feels like until we have a a
38:09
a well woven understanding of those
38:11
things we’re never going to get
38:13
anywhere with this but i wanted to also
38:15
point out that jerry gobb commented
38:17
marcus is spot on nothing like a crisis
38:19
to open things up
38:21
so speaking back i think to your
38:22
observation that you know 2020 has seen
38:25
a lot of digital transformation that
38:27
like you saw in 2007
38:29
so we can touch back on that and also
38:31
there’s a linkedin user
38:32
who doesn’t have a name that just says
38:34
linkedin user says business in service
38:36
of humanity should be easy
38:38
check
38:38
[Laughter]
38:41
yeah i mean it you’re right it should
38:44
it should let’s go back to the the
38:47
comment that jerry is agreeing with
38:48
about nothing like a crisis to open
38:50
things up so
38:50
what are some examples of what you’ve
38:52
been seeing that feel like you know
38:54
you’re just talking about the the
38:55
consolidation of power and of technology
38:58
uh and how a a good alternative to that
39:01
is reinvesting in local economies and
39:04
and strengthening those communities
39:06
um what are you seeing that gives you
39:07
hope around around that
39:09
momentum boy there is uh there’s a
39:14
movement that i’m seeing
39:16
uh especially around
39:19
and i know we’ve been talking a lot
39:20
about uh community
39:22
and uh collaboration i i’m about to i’m
39:25
about to talk about individuals
39:27
but only only from the position of
39:30
individuals being able to
39:31
be productive and sustain themselves
39:34
without a bunch of overhead
39:35
that’s that’s really what i mean i don’t
39:37
mean individuals moving as individuals
39:39
um but there is a lot of
39:42
really amazing stuff happening right now
39:44
in technology around
39:46
the ability for there to be a one-person
39:47
company right
39:49
and uh that’s really really powerful
39:52
um no code has gotten very real
39:56
as of this year um bubble and airtable
39:59
and coda and
40:00
all these things you know i mean as
40:02
someone who invests it was sort of a
40:03
rule of the road
40:04
i don’t even want to talk to a founder
40:06
unless they’ve got a technical
40:07
co-founder or they themselves can write
40:08
code
40:09
and that is really becoming not true
40:12
anymore like people are writing real or
40:15
building real applications
40:17
with no code that’s really big for you
40:20
to evolve past that
40:22
that understanding too because of your
40:23
bias as a technical
40:25
co-founder and and having come up
40:26
through technology so it you for you to
40:29
accept that and recognize that there’s
40:31
opportunity there is huge
40:32
it’s a it’s a big deal and and and it
40:34
democratizes things in
40:36
a really fantastic way right um so that
40:38
is a really really big thing
40:40
um i don’t know how to really really
40:42
frame this up
40:43
well but uh writing as a discipline
40:46
is is coming back people are realizing
40:49
the power of the written word
40:51
and and i think there’s also this this
40:53
sense that
40:55
i don’t know if it’s too far gone but
40:58
our media is
40:59
really not serving us and the
41:00
advertising industrial
41:02
complex uh is is really dangerous
41:06
and so we we need you know th this year
41:10
has really turned out the way that it
41:12
has because of citizen journalism right
41:14
i mean george floyd being the
41:16
highest you know level example of that
41:19
um
41:20
citizen journalism is is amazing
41:24
you know and we’ve we’ve really gotten
41:27
to this point now where the barrier to
41:29
be a civil
41:29
citizen journalist um or or a teacher
41:33
of people right a teacher of people in
41:36
this time when people need to be
41:37
reskilled if you don’t know if you like
41:39
or don’t like that word but
41:40
you know um where people need to to be
41:42
able to advance
41:44
to to get different skills to meet this
41:46
new economy and the new needs of the
41:47
economy
41:48
it’s never been more powerful um and
41:51
then i guess the the final thing that i
41:53
is just blowing my mind right now is um
41:58
this this uh this advancement that rome
42:01
research seems to be
42:02
uh introducing uh where
42:06
we’re getting out of um
42:09
category category based thinking and
42:11
we’re getting into truly having
42:13
technology that enabled
42:14
enables us to do network-based thinking
42:18
and that may be really really over most
42:20
people’s heads if you haven’t heard of
42:21
rome research
42:23
but it is a new quote-unquote
42:26
note-taking app
42:28
that really it um
42:31
gosh how do i even talk about this it is
42:33
a note-taking app like evernote or like
42:35
any of these other things
42:36
but the underlying technology gives each
42:39
one of us the ability to build
42:40
our own knowledge graph and
42:43
it’s really really powerful and
42:47
it it feels like the kind of thing when
42:49
the search engine
42:51
hit and you know it feels like that kind
42:54
of thing like whoa this is completely
42:55
blowing away
42:56
the way that we’ve been able to organize
42:58
our information personally
43:00
up until now these companies have been
43:01
able to organize information in these
43:03
incredible ways and then they make money
43:05
off of that ability
43:06
you know they sell us functionality we
43:09
don’t have the ability to organize our
43:10
own knowledge and information and
43:12
universe of data points in that way and
43:14
now that
43:15
that kind of technology is becoming
43:17
available
43:18
to everybody for very very low cost
43:21
so again i don’t i don’t know how to
43:24
articulate it very well but i’m just
43:25
feeling it i feel this wave of change
43:28
that is going to be pretty dramatic i
43:29
think two three years out
43:31
it feels like what you keep referring
43:33
what you keep describing
43:34
and you know you’ve used the term a few
43:36
times is democratization
43:38
across a lot of different services and a
43:40
lot of different opportunities
43:42
right yes uh and then uh
43:45
our linkedin user has popped up once or
43:47
twice more and said uh the economy is
43:49
people yes and
43:50
james gilchrist hi james it’s you okay i
43:53
don’t know why you’re not showing up as
43:54
james gilchrist but instead linkedin
43:56
user
43:57
and then says uh network-based thinking
43:59
more info please
44:00
thanks and i think you probably did
44:02
explain since he asked that
44:03
question uh so we’re good but um james
44:06
pop up again and let us know if there’s
44:08
a specific question you have about that
44:10
uh but that it’s really it’s such fun to
44:13
see
44:14
the um the the macro trend of that play
44:17
out of democratization across these
44:19
different services you talked about
44:20
learning you talked about knowledge
44:22
sharing uh you talked about the writing
44:24
the the citizen journalism
44:26
and you know so i think what what you
44:27
may be referring to partly when you talk
44:29
about the writing is the
44:30
the rise of these subscription
44:32
newsletters and and
44:34
right right yeah which you know i just
44:37
saw someone point out today you know
44:39
we got to make sure we give props to the
44:41
to um
44:42
folks who were doing it that were women
44:43
of color and and women early days that
44:45
you know way precede
44:47
tech bros doing this um but but however
44:50
it happens it’s good to see these cycles
44:52
play out where
44:53
you know something that has one
44:55
generation of life
44:57
gets another generation of life and then
44:59
maybe there becomes a more
45:00
truly democratized version that is more
45:02
inclusive uh
45:04
do you see us taking us having that kind
45:07
of trend toward things as we become more
45:10
socially aware more you know kind of
45:12
clued in
45:14
um i hope so so so i what i’m seeing
45:17
mostly is the tools
45:19
uh show up right i’m seeing the tool
45:21
show up and that’s really exciting i
45:22
mean kate one of the things i left out
45:23
but i should have said
45:24
is what you and i are doing right now
45:26
which i’m sure we could have done a year
45:28
ago
45:29
which is we run our own live video shows
45:33
like this is crazy right really
45:36
like this and it’s pretty inexpensive
45:38
and like you look great
45:40
and you sound great and there’s no lag
45:42
and um
45:43
that’s really really powerful but but
45:45
just to kind of get to the
45:46
democratization piece
45:49
i what i worry about is that when i
45:52
get into these spaces and i’m learning
45:54
about these new emerging things
45:56
i don’t see enough diversity in the
45:58
people who know about them
46:01
right and i don’t think i ever have
46:02
right um
46:04
there wasn’t enough diversity in 2007
46:06
when all this stuff was happening and
46:07
there’s still not enough diversity now
46:09
um just because there is such a thing as
46:11
like black twitter
46:13
doesn’t mean that you know if i if we
46:16
were to
46:16
take this conversation and put it into
46:19
black twitter that that a sufficient
46:20
percentage of
46:22
of that universe would know you know
46:24
some of the terms that we’re talking
46:25
about here and that
46:26
to me that’s the that’s the bigger
46:28
problem is
46:29
um we have to figure out how to be much
46:32
more intentional
46:33
about uh opening up
46:36
the the the opportunities on the front
46:39
end of these things because that’s where
46:40
all the values created
46:42
you know what i mean it’s it’s it’s in
46:44
it’s in the front end
46:45
of these things not in the consumer wave
46:47
of them where everyone’s just using them
46:49
it’s in the maker phase you know where
46:52
everything is messy and nothing quite
46:53
makes enough sense and people are just
46:55
sort of
46:56
figuring it out but eventually those
46:58
same people that were just figuring it
47:00
out
47:00
end up you know like i think about in
47:02
2007 when i went to south by southwest
47:04
and i met matt
47:05
matt mullenweg and he was just like a
47:07
backpack dude
47:09
and it’s like now his software
47:12
powers every important website on the on
47:15
the internet
47:16
you know what i mean and and it’s like
47:20
how do we get that group of people at
47:23
any given phase and time
47:25
to be more you know inclusive how do we
47:27
do that
47:29
um i don’t have the answer for it but
47:32
it’s it’s
47:32
it’s the question yeah it’s a good
47:35
question and i think you know
47:36
it certainly seems like the the resource
47:39
you’ve created with
47:40
create and orchestrate is a step and the
47:43
work that you’re doing to
47:45
to take that message out and make sure
47:47
you’re having that conversation
47:49
in different video shows and podcasts is
47:51
a step but obviously
47:52
it’s there are more steps to be done and
47:55
it’s not just on you it’s on me it’s on
47:57
you know a lot of white people it’s on a
47:58
lot of people who have a lot of
47:59
platforms and a lot of opportunities so
48:01
i hope that we’re i hope that we’re
48:03
having that conversation in a meaningful
48:05
enough way
48:06
to to promulgate that and to make sure
48:08
that we understand what some of the
48:10
network nodes of that that um
48:13
organizational imperative really are
48:17
but yeah you know it’s so i i think a
48:21
lot of
48:21
the theme to the notes that i had made
48:24
uh in in rereading your book and and
48:26
preparing for this discussion was
48:28
so much about convincing people to
48:31
become
48:32
some part of something bigger than
48:33
themselves and that’s you know it feels
48:35
like that’s part of this discussion too
48:36
right it’s
48:37
it’s it’s as much a part of the soccer
48:39
discussion as it is the jump start
48:41
discussion as it is the bar camp
48:43
discussion as it is
48:44
the how do you get there to be more
48:46
black founders
48:48
uh you know more people who are aware of
48:50
the opportunities of
48:51
you know these democratized so
48:53
supposedly democratized tech
48:55
opportunities that aren’t really
48:56
democratized until
48:58
you know you can have a meaningful
48:59
conversation in black twitter and know
49:01
that there’s a
49:02
significant population that’s going to
49:03
understand that there’s an opportunity
49:05
there
49:06
right so is it a matter of convincing
49:10
people to become
49:11
part of something bigger than themselves
49:13
is it a matter of convincing the
49:15
the society at large to
49:18
expand its thinking and and its
49:21
acceptance
49:21
and create space for more than what’s
49:25
typically accepted
49:27
i feel like this is a yeah yeah yes and
49:30
right yeah
49:30
right so so um you know
49:34
the the ceo wells fargo just got outed
49:36
for for
49:37
you know making a really dumb statement
49:39
um
49:40
you know that i’m sure he regrets at
49:42
this point uh about there not being a
49:44
sufficient you know pipeline of of
49:46
of talented black people or whatever
49:48
whatever dumb thing they said
49:49
just just shouldn’t have said it and you
49:52
know
49:52
um that there is a
49:57
there there is a there’s a complete this
50:00
has been blown wide open this year right
50:01
there’s a complete
50:03
lack of understanding about um
50:07
certainly the black experience i can i
50:09
can talk about that because i’m black i
50:10
don’t want to speak on behalf of any
50:12
other
50:12
demographic that i can’t actually fully
50:14
understand but there’s a really big
50:16
uh lack of understanding about the black
50:18
experience in america
50:19
on on the part of many many white people
50:21
i won’t say all but like many many white
50:23
people especially white people in power
50:24
right
50:25
and so they just assume that
50:28
the rules and the policies and the
50:30
procedures and the norms that they have
50:32
are are good and
50:36
and what and and lead to opportunity for
50:39
black people
50:40
if black people were were only available
50:43
right not not understanding all of the
50:46
huge
50:48
embedded gotchas that are that are in
50:51
there
50:52
um that that come up as different code
50:55
words
50:57
that that don’t say they don’t scream
50:59
racism but they act out racism
51:01
right you know and so that is that is
51:04
that is one
51:05
really really big part of it another
51:08
really really big part of it
51:09
is that it is just a truth that a lot of
51:12
black people because
51:13
because of all of those norms and
51:16
policies that
51:17
have been exclusive and have not you
51:19
know engaged
51:21
us as a people here in this country
51:23
there are just some things we don’t know
51:25
you know like like that we that we
51:28
need to need to learn in order to
51:31
better you know participate in
51:33
capitalism at the highest levels
51:35
so like like a lot of us don’t
51:36
understand sort of the more
51:38
sophisticated aspects of financing
51:39
especially in the private markets
51:41
that’s growing quite a bit you know
51:43
there’s there’s a growing vanguard of
51:44
black vcs who are out here who are doing
51:46
awesome work educating people
51:47
this guy matt conwell he’s he’s in
51:49
baltimore he like does you know amas all
51:51
the time
51:52
you know so there are definitely people
51:54
who are who are breaking the mold and
51:56
who are here and doing the education
51:57
work
51:58
but look when you talk like across the
52:00
entire country and you really are
52:02
looking at all the people
52:03
is at least my anecdotal experience when
52:05
i talk to people that’s why i wrote a
52:06
chapter about venture capital right
52:08
because there are aspects that we just
52:11
have got
52:11
to get out to people so they understand
52:14
that this multi-trillion dollar
52:18
thing that is venture capital okay
52:21
can be explained in a single chapter
52:23
like it’s that simple
52:24
you and you don’t even need any
52:26
credentials to participate in it right
52:28
literally there’s that’s the gap yeah
52:31
it’s a heady chapter
52:32
but it can be explained in one chapter
52:34
but it can be explained in one chapter
52:36
right and even
52:36
even if you need to read that chapter
52:38
over and over again for a couple of
52:39
weeks you’ll get it you can get it
52:41
so the point is you know
52:44
making sure that they know they being
52:47
anybody who
52:48
feels like they’re on the outside
52:50
looking in that you belong
52:52
and that the world is moving in a
52:54
direction that will
52:56
that will um that will meet you to your
52:59
belief
53:00
of that it’s it hasn’t always been there
53:02
and it’s not as
53:04
as perfect as it needs to be but it is
53:07
moving in that direction it’s moving in
53:09
the direction of
53:10
meeting you where you think you want to
53:12
be as long as you think
53:14
you belong you have a better chance of
53:16
actually being there than if you don’t
53:18
think you belong so but but a lot of
53:21
that is self-belief a lot of that is
53:22
understanding a lot of that is knowledge
53:23
a lot of that is
53:25
you know just how you understand those
53:27
who are keeping you out
53:28
and and all those types of things so so
53:31
a lot of the the things i’m trying to
53:33
share
53:34
are really just um
53:38
just my my own experiences hoping that
53:41
other people can
53:42
can say that dude’s not that special you
53:44
know what i’m saying if he did that
53:45
i can do better than that you are
53:47
especially honestly but i think that
53:49
word unlikely is
53:50
is part of the secret sauce here right
53:52
like you know overcoming
53:54
the concept it’s if it’s a self-concept
53:57
of unlikely
53:58
yes then that seems like it’s a barrier
54:01
to yourself is that fair and it is it no
54:03
no no look it
54:05
it is i don’t care what color you are or
54:07
what gender you are
54:09
there is a reality to um external forces
54:12
and there’s a reality to internal forces
54:14
right which one do you have more control
54:16
over
54:19
the side let’s let the audience answer
54:23
yeah the inside game so that’s the one
54:26
every
54:26
you know whenever your energy and your
54:29
spirits are high enough
54:30
the one you’ve got to focus on is the
54:32
inside game
54:33
that doesn’t mean you know you don’t
54:34
call the outside game out for what it is
54:36
and you don’t work to help other
54:38
people to break through the outside game
54:40
but like work the inside game
54:42
don’t be so outside focused that you’re
54:44
not developing you know
54:46
you’re that you’re not developing
54:47
yourself and you’re how you see yourself
54:49
and
54:50
your belonging and how important it is
54:52
for you and in your intellect and your
54:54
brilliance
54:55
to be part of the solution right and
54:58
that’s a really big ask right now i know
55:00
especially right like
55:01
during covid during the you know sort of
55:04
aftermath of george
55:06
floyd and all of the uh social racial
55:08
protests and and everything that have
55:10
been happening it’s a really big ask to
55:11
have people be
55:13
able to be okay internally or do kind of
55:15
internal examination but
55:17
but i think you’re right it is it is so
55:18
much uh that’s what’s within our control
55:21
to to whatever extent it is
55:23
and i loved it you know it brings me
55:24
back around to the last chapter of your
55:26
book where you talk about the mountain
55:28
climbing
55:29
metaphor and how much you learned
55:32
from from that experience and i don’t
55:35
want to ruin it for anyone who hasn’t
55:37
gotten a chance to read the book yet
55:38
you’ll just have to buy the book and
55:39
read it
55:40
but i did capture the um the summary of
55:43
some
55:44
of your lessons like the peak is not the
55:45
peak the air is different at the top
55:47
it’s harder on the way down fatigue is
55:49
inevitable
55:50
and i think you know without even
55:52
hearing the the stories
55:54
that you tell about the mountain
55:56
climbing i feel like those lessons are
55:58
important for people to hear and to
56:01
acknowledge that peak is not the peak
56:03
the air is different at the top it’s
56:04
harder on the way down fatigue is
56:06
inevitable what can you say
56:08
about that process that commitment to
56:12
understanding yourself and improving
56:14
yourself and
56:15
you know being ready for the next change
56:18
the next
56:19
the next peak you know the next
56:20
opportunity
56:24
it basically boils down to your movie
56:27
and your book is about your journey
56:28
it’s not about a destination right it’s
56:31
not about a goal
56:32
nobody like nobody cares about that they
56:34
care about all the stuff that happened
56:36
along the way
56:37
that’s what makes the story interesting
56:39
and um
56:40
and and when you when you get there it’s
56:43
never going to be like what you think it
56:44
is
56:45
um and so just just understand that
56:50
in a in a time such as this where these
56:53
are really big asks
56:55
um it is also true
56:58
we may never experience another moment
57:01
like this
57:02
in our lives as humans where we were put
57:05
in time out
57:06
to like think about what we did
57:10
right and it’s like
57:14
if you can oh and and i can’t say if you
57:17
can
57:17
right but i can i can say if you can
57:23
take the time and muster the energy to
57:25
do
57:26
the work you know you need to do right
57:30
you know i don’t know the work you need
57:32
to do but you know the work you need to
57:34
do
57:34
and you may not have another time like
57:36
this
57:37
you know to be able to do it this is a
57:40
really really
57:42
unique potentially once in a lifetime
57:43
moment that we’re that we’re sitting in
57:45
um yeah with a convergence of a lot of
57:48
things going on
57:49
i mean this is a very it’s a very u.s
57:51
centric perspective
57:53
you know some of the things that we’ve
57:54
been talking about but i know that you
57:55
know the ricochet
57:56
effect of you know the george floyd
57:58
protest had been felt around the world
58:00
i know that the u.s presidential
58:02
election is felt around the world
58:04
i know that you know other countries are
58:06
going through their
58:07
uh political processes and and turmoil
58:10
but
58:10
everyone has an eye on what’s happening
58:12
in the us so
58:13
you know for those of us who are in the
58:15
us you know it’s
58:16
it’s a lot happening all at once and uh
58:19
yeah i think these are great life
58:23
lessons it’s a great moment as you say
58:24
to to sit with it and
58:26
and kind of examine you know what is it
58:28
that i need to do
58:29
what is it i need to take away what is
58:31
it i need to give back
58:33
uh what has what has this moment taught
58:36
you
58:37
about what what you need to do or take
58:39
away or give back
58:42
yeah uh taught me teaching me you know
58:45
um i i think
58:48
it is it is teaching me
58:52
that i can be okay
58:55
um in situations that i probably
58:59
prior to this would have said i would
59:00
not have been okay
59:02
um and it’s it’s giving me a glimpse
59:06
into our much much larger and longer
59:11
story
59:11
as humanity you know like i feel like
59:14
up until this point i only read about
59:17
epic moments in history
59:19
hopefully the closest thing that that
59:21
that i can say that i experienced would
59:23
be 9 11
59:24
you know um but this is different right
59:28
like
59:28
this is for sure an epic moment in
59:31
humanity
59:32
no no question this is this this would
59:34
go up in the history books with some of
59:36
the
59:36
biggest things that have ever happened
59:38
in in recorded history
59:40
and uh that is
59:44
awesome in the true sense of the word ah
59:46
right like it it um
59:48
it does make me look at the trees longer
59:52
it makes me look at the squirrels longer
59:54
it makes me
59:55
um pay more attention to my dreams it
59:58
makes me
60:00
value every conversation i’m having a
60:02
little bit more
60:03
it it it’s teaching me
60:07
when i’m having a bad day because oh my
60:10
god the hits keep coming
60:12
it’s like that is entirely okay you know
60:15
um and my emotions are not here to be
60:17
suppressed
60:18
they’re they’re they’re here to teach me
60:20
something
60:21
um you know it’s t i feel like i’m just
60:24
learning about life
60:25
the reality of life you know here i’m
60:28
i’ve raised two kids they’re 21 and 19.
60:30
i’m 44 years old i’ve done a bunch of
60:32
stuff i’ve never learned as much as i’ve
60:34
learned this year
60:35
yeah that’s that’s a big that’s a big
60:38
statement
60:39
oh there’s no question i mean this this
60:41
is i mean i i don’t know who else
60:44
someone tell me who else has like you
60:45
know had a bigger moment than
60:47
this is unbelievable like the stuff that
60:49
keeps happening
60:50
you know and uh and it’s also just like
60:55
i feel like there’s so many uh white
60:57
people specifically around the topic of
60:59
like racism where you know
61:00
white people are saying uh oh my god i
61:02
didn’t know i you know i can’t believe
61:04
how much i’m learning that’s like a
61:05
pretty common sentiment sure but i gotta
61:08
tell you like
61:09
you know i’ve had plenty of
61:10
conversations with black people where
61:11
we’re saying the same thing
61:12
you know because we had all sort of been
61:14
just living
61:15
with this acceptance of the way that it
61:17
was but now
61:18
that it’s an open everyday conversation
61:21
it all hits different you know what i’m
61:23
saying it’s not that we
61:25
like we certainly knew it was here but
61:27
man
61:28
it hits different when we’re talking
61:31
about it every day
61:32
you know and we’re protesting about it
61:35
and
61:35
we’re watching our president you know
61:38
not
61:39
acknowledge it and we’re watching people
61:42
openly try to gaslight us and we know it
61:44
and we’re just like
61:45
wow this you know what i mean like we’re
61:48
all learning about it i think in a in an
61:50
even in an even different way
61:52
and so yeah there’s just a ton of
61:54
learning so much learning happening
61:56
right now
61:56
yeah i think a number of people have
61:58
pointed out that it’s a very encouraging
62:01
time even as
62:02
as depressing and hard and emotionally
62:05
draining as it is
62:06
uh it’s a very encouraging time just
62:08
because
62:10
if you look at things through this the
62:11
macro lens of history
62:14
it’s like the discourse is elevating i
62:16
mean yes there’s resistance but if you
62:18
you know that the set of laws that are
62:20
frequently attributed to schopenhauer
62:22
about you know things are
62:23
violently opposed and uh ridiculed and
62:26
then accepted as
62:27
um accepted as a given i think it’s the
62:30
other way around it’s
62:30
ridiculed then violently opposed and
62:32
accepted as given then we’re definitely
62:33
in that violently opposed state
62:35
right the the violent opposition has
62:38
literally come forward literal violent
62:42
opposition
62:43
and that suggests if
62:46
if the pattern holds that we may be on
62:49
the verge of a genuine breakthrough
62:51
to where we get to that third stage that
62:54
equity is
62:55
genuinely accepted just taken as a given
62:59
and i don’t know whether we can expect
63:01
that you know
63:03
in a matter of a couple of years our
63:04
lifetimes whatever but
63:06
just to to know that if you can think of
63:09
it within that framework
63:11
you know if that framework is true that
63:14
you know that that we can take
63:16
you know some encouragement from
63:18
thinking
63:19
okay well it’s out there it’s happening
63:21
it’s surfaced
63:23
and if it’s surface that means that you
63:25
know sunlight is the best disinfectant
63:26
and we can just get this
63:28
get this done with we can get it the
63:30
conversations happening
63:31
get the knowledge out there yeah i don’t
63:33
think anyone finds the violent
63:35
opposition as a
63:36
as a place of comfort but i think but i
63:39
ultimately think you’re right
63:40
i ultimately think you’re right i agree
63:41
with you you know i i think
63:43
that’s the hard part right the hard part
63:45
is the hard part is the hard part
63:47
and we’re in the hard part right yeah
63:49
and excuse me if i articulated that
63:51
wrong i don’t mean to suggest that the
63:52
violence is
63:53
is comforting it’s more that the moment
63:56
suggests
63:58
that that may be the direction that
64:00
we’re moving through
64:02
uh yeah and it so by the way um
64:05
a little off topic but just the social
64:07
highest jack rutledge
64:08
drops in and says really good to be able
64:10
to drop in on the two of you in
64:11
conversation
64:12
what’s up jack good to see you jack
64:15
jackson the book
64:16
yeah i always have to remind jack the
64:18
jackson the book is jack the
64:19
mountaineering guide
64:21
at the end i uh i didn’t know that jack
64:25
got married to someone he met at your
64:27
wedding i love this
64:29
jack i want to hear all about it i’m
64:31
going to go check out i’m going to go
64:32
snoop on your facebook profile jack
64:35
and uh james gilchrist says lucky me my
64:39
colleague rescheduled squirrels rule
64:41
every smile as a gift and then says
64:43
tumultuous memories
64:44
moments in history have led to positive
64:46
greatest positive change they are just
64:48
challenging to live through which is a
64:51
fair i
64:51
feel like a fair statement amen um
64:54
one thing you know before we wrap and
64:56
these are all i mean i think that the
64:58
big picture
65:00
you know kind of humanity level
65:01
discussion is a
65:03
wonderful way to to wrap but i also
65:05
wanted to see if we could squeeze in
65:07
just a minute or two
65:08
of asking you about you know one of the
65:10
things that’s happened during covet is
65:12
certainly the the emphasis on telehealth
65:14
services and you know talking about
65:16
those digital transformation trends that
65:17
you’ve seen and
65:18
and you know what’s happening in terms
65:20
of 2020’s technology emphasis
65:22
certainly people have seen that jump in
65:25
in telehealth or ehealth services but i
65:27
would imagine that through your work
65:29
with
65:29
jumpstart and health further that you’ve
65:31
actually been seeing these services for
65:33
quite some time so i wonder what you
65:36
expect to emerge
65:37
as part of the human experience of
65:39
virtual healthcare
65:40
with technology what do you expect us to
65:43
see
65:44
in the the moments months years to come
65:48
yeah i i think uh thank you for asking
65:50
it in that way because it’s really
65:52
important to note that
65:54
uh telehealth as a technology just as
65:56
you would imagine just like we’ve had
65:57
skype and all these other things for a
65:58
long time telehealth has been around for
65:59
a very long time
66:01
it has not been uh appropriately
66:03
reimbursable
66:04
so the policy did not support widespread
66:07
use of it there was a lot of stuff
66:08
around
66:09
whether or not you could actually see a
66:10
doctor across state lines and
66:12
all these different regulatory barriers
66:14
that made telehealth just un
66:17
it just wasn’t viable it just wasn’t
66:18
viable of course we have a public health
66:20
emergency where people cannot actually
66:22
go into doctor’s offices well all those
66:24
regular regulatory barriers come down
66:26
because we got to keep things going
66:28
somehow and i think
66:30
uh when you have things like that happen
66:32
and then everything is fine and the sky
66:34
doesn’t fall people realize oh wow well
66:36
maybe
66:36
because they were always trying to
66:38
regulate to protect people but then they
66:39
realized
66:40
okay well we removed the regulatory
66:42
barriers and people were fine
66:44
so that regulation makes actually no
66:46
sense and people should have more choice
66:47
and they should be able to do telehealth
66:49
if they want to
66:50
and so i don’t think that we’re going to
66:51
be able to put that cap back in the box
66:52
i think
66:53
you know schrodinger’s cat reference
66:55
there
66:57
yes you know going forward uh telehealth
67:00
will be
67:00
will be a thing um we were already on
67:03
the path to doing more and more
67:04
uh healthcare in the home you know
67:07
patients feel more secure in the home it
67:09
is a better environment for healing
67:11
but again it was something that they
67:13
were trying to stop because
67:14
is the home an appropriate place for
67:16
healthcare to take place lo and behold
67:18
it’s just fine
67:19
we just have to create the appropriate
67:20
protocols for it so it’s gonna be more
67:22
and more
67:22
moving procedures out of you know
67:25
inpatient settings into the homes you’re
67:27
going to see a lot more of that
67:28
uh you know i i think that we’re we’re
67:31
finally going to start seeing some real
67:32
breakthroughs in innovation in
67:33
healthcare most of the
67:35
the lack of innovation has not been
67:37
because we didn’t have great thinkers
67:39
because we didn’t have great technology
67:40
because we didn’t have capital partners
67:42
willing to really back the innovation
67:44
it has largely been regulatory barriers
67:47
um
67:47
and and what moves in health care is
67:49
what’s reimbursable
67:51
so as new um codes for procedures come
67:54
up
67:54
that are reimbursable remote patient
67:56
monitoring was a huge one that came up
67:57
in the last year so now we have doctors
68:00
caring about it doctors will care about
68:01
what they can get paid for is the simple
68:03
uh you know sort of end of story and we
68:06
do finally have innovation
68:07
there from center for medicare and
68:09
medicaid services so
68:11
from that perspective it’s exciting and
68:12
i would just say you know
68:14
if there’s so much stuff around
68:16
healthcare but
68:17
but if you really want to know where
68:19
healthcare is going tune into
68:21
cms the center for medicare and medicaid
68:23
services in america they basically drive
68:25
the thing
68:26
and and it’s quite frankly not that
68:28
complicated for the average
68:29
you know uh american even the layman’s
68:31
like understanding you
68:33
you guys spent a month on it then you’ll
68:35
kind of get it so if you really want to
68:37
know where this is going just
68:38
track what’s happening at the cms and so
68:41
with that what are some of the the big
68:44
picture trends besides telehealth that
68:46
you see coming
68:46
in the future of tech and health that
68:48
intersection
68:50
they’re mostly at the business model
68:51
level um so uh
68:53
well okay the fda is experimenting with
68:56
many
68:57
types of fast tracking of things um i
68:59
think that this this
69:00
vaccine is a big motivator for that but
69:03
there’s
69:03
generally speaking i think there’s going
69:04
to be a lot more devices coming out
69:07
via fda fast track mechanisms
69:10
there is going to be much more uh
69:13
remote doctor supervision allowance
69:16
that’s going to start happening and so
69:18
this is not just telehealth but it’s
69:19
also like
69:20
who can do something with you with a
69:24
doctor somewhere else that’s actually
69:25
not
69:26
overseeing the procedure so it lowers
69:28
the cost of the
69:29
of the labor provider which should lower
69:31
the cost of the procedure for the
69:33
patients slash customer slash insurance
69:35
company
69:36
um so that’s that’s going to be uh on
69:39
the horizon as well
69:40
um there are some you know particular
69:42
service lines that are that are going to
69:44
see a lot of innovation uh end stage
69:46
kidney disease things of that nature
69:48
um but but look there’s there’s just a
69:50
ton of uncertainty
69:51
the truth is there’s a lot of
69:52
uncertainty i mean the death of rbg is
69:54
is
69:55
significant because it puts uh the aca
69:58
into real question as
69:59
as it pertains to a big supreme court
70:01
you know
70:02
case that’s up for it right now there’s
70:05
just a lot of uncertainty
70:07
health care is driven by d.c and there’s
70:10
a lot of uncertainty in dc so there’s a
70:12
lot of uncertainty in health care
70:14
i do think ultimately you know if you’re
70:15
looking 10 15 years out
70:18
we’re gonna see a much more efficient
70:19
much better healthcare system but
70:21
for the next four it’s kind of murky
70:23
because i don’t know where we’re gonna
70:24
be where we’re gonna land
70:25
that makes sense no thanks for that uh
70:28
forecast hey
70:29
real quick before we sign off and let
70:31
let people know how they can find and
70:33
follow you and your work online
70:36
marcus whitney.com marcus whitney on all
70:39
the socials
70:41
that’s it okay that’s easy
70:45
i am so grateful to you for joining me
70:47
and for allowing our conversation to go
70:49
in
70:49
organic directions uh you know into
70:52
business soccer
70:53
race social justice economy
70:57
everything and so i’m i’m i’m grateful
70:59
to you i i
71:01
appreciate our friendship and i’m so
71:02
glad that you were able to join me for
71:04
this
71:04
i’m so glad i was invited i get to call
71:06
my mom and tell her i made it i was on
71:08
the technical show
71:09
i can’t wait right thank you to everyone
71:12
who’s tuned in thank you for those of
71:14
you commented
71:15
and we’ll see you next week thank you
71:17
very much marcus
71:20
bye

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